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of it anyways. number one, ayman al zawahiri, the long-time number two to osama bin laden, communicating with an organization that's considered even more danger, nasir al wahsyshi. he's experimented with exploding clothes, clothes impregnanted with explosives, not to hide bombs but clothes that are bombs. but this isn't about an exploding shirt. this is said to be, according to sources that talked to nbc news, something big, that the head of al qaeda ordered to do something at the end of ramadan and that's now. when they talked about that, larry, the u.s. government listened and that's what kicked off the biggest alert since 9/11. >> steve handelsman over the weekend, congressman peter king, very knowledgeable guy, he said they picked up specific dates, specific dates. do we know anything about that? >> reporter: what we're told, larry, is that the conversation, and it may have just been one, it's such big guys and they so avoid communicating and if there was just one conversation it's because of they communicated and because of who they were. and the communication we're told specified t
on the cards. he got rid of virtually the entire top leadership of al-qaeda with the exception of osama bin laden who eventually was caught. >> now we agree. bring bush back. >> i don't see this as partisan. i am not making it partisan. >> you keep talking about the two presidents and this is america. if a come play sen see is our biggest enemy we should work together and say, look, do you trust the government, or do you not? skepticism is healthy in a democracy. every bit of skepticism they got today and for the administration was the same as the bush administration. i think that is probably a good thing. >> doesn't decimate mean you destroy everything but one-10th of one percent? >> i am not sure of the exact definition. >> can you get back to me 1234* we are talking talking about al-qaeda being decimated. >> there should be no doubt. today america is stronger and al-qaeda is on the path to defeat. we decimated al-qaeda's leadership. >> al-qaeda is on the path to defeat and bin laden is dead. >> we december saw -- decimated al-qaeda central and eliminated osama bin laden. >> al-qaeda is m
with the fact that u.s. special operations forces in 2011 found osama bin laden and killed him. that was a huge blow to the organization. but i would point out, in the years leading up to that, there were a lot of analysts who believed that modern was out of touch and was a figurehead and did not play a day-to-day role. in an organization that had evolved more into affiliates. one of the stories are remember writing after that raid was that bin laden played a very important role in managing this organization that had all of these various affiliate and aspiring affiliates. and i think we are in the same situation now where there's no doubt about it that al qaeda has lost a lot of senior leaders in pakistan because of a very lethal thrown more. andver, they have adapted he has shown the ability to manage and delegate. in that respect, at least we shutdown all of these embassies and with sun alerts being significant, i think that shows that, while there have been victories, at least the threat about qaeda is far from over at this point. am eager to you,, tom. hawaii to elaborate a bit on the conce
leadership of al qaeda with the exception of osama bin laden who was eventually caught. >> why are we making this -- i don't see this as partisan. the most dangerous -- we keep talking about the two presidents, this is america, and if complacency is our biggest enemy, we should all work together and say look, do you trust the government or not. skepticism, healthy in a democracy, and every bit of skepticism they got today for the administration was the same as the bush administration used to do. i think that's probably a good thing. >> decimate means you destroy everything but 10%? >> i think maybe, not sure about the technical definition. >> can you get back to me while we roll the tape where they talk about al qaeda being decimated. >> there should be no doubt today america is stronger and al qaeda is on the path to defeat. we decimated al qaeda's leadership. al qaeda is on the path to defeat and bin laden is dead. >> we decimated al qaeda central, we eliminated osama bin laden. >> al qaeda is much weaker than it was when i came into office. >> osama bin laden is dead and general motors is
is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> reporter: the white house aide said the cia director and other officials noted al qaeda affiliates were gaining steam. >> did he give the full picture to the people in the campaign about the threat of al qaeda, when that was his talking about again and again? >> it is indisputable the elimination of osama bin laden was a major accomplishment in the effort against al qaeda. we have been clear and the president has been clear that the threat from al qaeda very much remains. >> reporter: republicans know al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is its deadliest affiliate of all. >> al qaeda is in many ways stronger than 9/11, because it mutated and spread and come at us different directions. >> reporter: tense times in the mid east, where the u.s. is having talks in egypt with a jailed senior leader of muslim brotherhood, amid fears the government is losing control of key cities. >> that will allow the sinai to become as you said wild west of terrorism where groups like al qaeda and hamas can coordinate and plot attacks. >> reporter: as the egyptian govern
by osama bin laden when he was leading al qaeda. they weren't always followed and they didn't always trigger this kind of response. >> exactly. richard aeengel, thanks to you. there's been a higher threat level, a lot of extra security there but they're telling you this is unrelated to what is going on in the middle east and in north africa. >> it is, andrea. what we're hearing from former and current military and intelligence officials in pakistan is that although it is a separate incident that they're dealing with in pakistan, it is certainly when you take a step back and look at it parallel in many ways. over the weekend in islamabad the capital city of pakistan was shut down. we are told this was prompted by an intelligence intercept of communications, possibly between two taliban leaders, talking about a potential target attack in islamabad. maybe on a pakistani target though. not necessarily on american or international target. we're told that could have been navy force -- sorry. air force target or a navy installation or even an intelligence office in or around the capital. wh
, the intelligence that sparked all this was a communication from osama bin ladin's replacement, ayman al zawahiri to the head of the al qaeda arm in yemen. the terrorist leaders discussed plotting an attack to coincide with a in muslim holy day this week. this afternoon nbc news is reporting that one reason the u.s. reacted so aggressively is because al qaeda operatives said they wanted an attack that, quote, would change the balance of power in the region. well, as american counter terrorist officials are dealing with this threat, some on the right are using it to hit the president as weak on national security. big surprise there. take a look what bill kristol and former senator jim demint said this weekend on fox. >> four years ago, president obama gave a much heralded speech, his outreach to the muslim world. now four years later we're closing embassies throughout the arab world. a year ago he said al qaeda is on the run. now we seem to be on the run. i'm not criticizing the decision to close the embassies. that's probably the right thing to do for the sake of trying to save american lives and
the killing of osama bin laden,ut have things improved marginally in the past few months? >> it is difficult to know exactly. we can say with confidence that the two services work together quite regularly and interact regularly. if things have gotten better or worse, it is difficult to know. we have seen fewer drone strikes recently in pakistan. >> that was something john kerry was keen to stress when he visited. >> the point is that they are saying, we are trying to take the pakistanis concerns. they are trying to use this tool in a more irregular fashion, if you will come and try to use other ways and open the line of communication. the americans realize this is an important relationship, both in terms with pakistan, and what happens with pakistan -- afghanistan and 2014. with aowards 2014 fraught relationship with pakistan is in nobody's interest. >> when you are looking at the intelligence gathering, this seems to ask him -- this seems to have come from some sort of chapter, it mexico fund -- difficult for any mission or foreign national living and working in pakistan. it hasa very long
and communication security of osama bin laden is, he would not be online in direct communication. he shows up at various points. there is a suggestion that he was indeed in the conversation. people have asked us, why would you report all these details? our sources have made it clear that when the leader who reported the communications -- it was enough information for al qaeda to walk back the cat. we left out some details from our initial report. believe,oint, we especially since our sources were giving us this information, that it was important to explain the current context of threats. point, i think it is a tough one. cannot argue with the fact that u.s. special operations forces in 2011 found osama bin laden and killed him. that was a huge blow to the organization. that, years leading up to a lot of analysts believe that bin laden was out of touch. they figured he did not play a day-to-day role. the organization has devolved into affiliates. one of the stories i remember writing after the raid -- bin laden played an important role in terms of managing this organization with these various
. these are armed attacks with r.p.g.'s, et cetera. it does make you wonder the kill of osama bin laden, a profound moral victory, didn't end the effectiveness of al qaeda. this is being manned by al zawahari who is at large. maybe we didn't end al qaeda by going -- >>steve: maybe we busted into the centralized al qaeda h.q. now it's fragmented all over. some are wondering whether or not you look at what happened in benghazi, where they killed four brave americans, clearly some sort of al qaeda-linked terror attack, and who's been held accountable. nobody. even though we knew, "the new york times" talked to some of the suspects and others have since then, we haven't done anything. now some are wondering is this a gross overreaction to some intel? susan rice, who is currently running the n.s.a., reportedly sees similarities trying to make sure this is not a repeat of what happened last year. here's lindsay graham and bill crystal. >> they are taking the right approach to this. benghazi was a complete failure. the threats were real there, reporting was real and we dropped the ball. we've learned from
to the dramatic move. turns out, it wasn't just an intercepted message between sth man who replaced osama bin laden and the yemen leader. there's a leader of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and what we had heard before is that there was a call between the two. but now we're hearing something different. in fact, it's an exclusive report that we're getting today that perhaps more than 20 al qaeda operatives from around the world were on some sort of conference call and we were able to listen in on that. one of the reporters who broke that story is joining us now. john is the senior correspondent for national security and politics for "newsweek" and the daily beat. i don't want to ruin your story but tell our viewers what they need to know about this supposed conference call. >> right. so we know that u.s. intelligence has been monitoring multiple threat streams and multiple communication streams between al qaeda's core leadership in pakistan and their associates in yemen but what we're able to report new today with that, the call that actually led the worldwide terror alert and the closing of
analyst paul crookshank say there's a new twist, al qaeda's leader in yemen, one osama bin laden's personal secretary, is now reportedly the second in command in the worldwide operation. is this an opportunity potent l potentially for him to make his mark? >> it may well be. it could be his coming out party as the de facto number two of al qaeda. the plot was in the works at the same time as this announcement was going to come out that he was playing this bigger role in the al qaeda global terrorist network. >> president obama stuck to his planned weekend schedule, golfing and going to will camp david for his birthday. a white house official says the president will will continue to be updated about the threat through the weekend. the white house says it will not comment on intelligence in this case, particularly as it relates to a "new york times" report that says that some of this intelligence came from intercepted electronic communications between senior al qaeda operatives. our terrorism expert paul crookshank says regardless of what happens as a result of this threat, the te
of going after al qaeda directly. i don't think the administration that got osama bin laden, rhetorical bluster didn't bring oun osama bin laden, actual intelligence and aggressive maneuvers ron insana side of pakistan did. i don't think the former dictators in libya or in egypt would think that this president has been weak. i think what we've seen is a president who has tried to get the united states to conform and comport with the sort of moral standing that -- >> i don't think -- now i feel i need to counter on the other side, becae the fact of the matter is barack obama has adopted policies that i think have actually been less targeted. he will fire drones into countries where we aren't even at war. when we had a plan, a policy, a program that would allow us to go and snatch terrorists out like khalid sheikh mohammed. bring them out without killing their 4-year-old daughters, without killing their grandmothers, without killing everybody in the general vicinity. and i've got to say, nothing that he has done has made us comport to international standards more than under george w. bush
who was formerly osama bin laden's secretary. we know that there was chatter. but we don't know the most important things. exactly where, exactly when. so we've seen a blanket response in much of the muslim world and the question is how long can you keep this up. these kind of attacks, these militants, aren't going to be deterred for very long. this might throw off their game. it might, according to analysts we've been speaking to, cause them to change their timing but al qaeda in the iranian peninsula has been there for several years and has been very aggressive for the last several years. >> pete williams, we know that they were increasing security on flights coming from overseas to the united states. they don't see a domestic component to this. but a lot of people are wondering, we know that osama bin laden stopped his people from using cell phones. so what kind of communications -- what kifbd ch kind of chatt eter is intercept presumably from the nsa? >> we don't know if this is on the phone, is it e-mails or some other kind of communication we aren't thinking about. i'm tol
succeeded osama bin laden zawahiri. the two men reportedly agreed that they wanted to do something big. timed to the end of the muslim holy month of ramadan which is right now. and that's what led the united states to close 19 embassies. there they are on the map and consulates in the mideast and africa. there's still a lot that remains unknown including which target. over the weekend, one thing clear from every lawmaker and official with knowledge of the attack, nobody's crying wolf here. this is one of the most serious threats in years. >> been an awful lot of hatter out there, chatter means conversations among terrorists about the planning that's going on, very reminiscent of what we saw pre-9/11. this is the most serious threat that i've seen in the last several years. >> we need to know and realize we're living in an increasingly dangerous world and this many specific threat that we've been briefed on over and over again has reached a new level. >> i must say this is probably one of the most specific incredible threats i've seen perhaps since 9/11 because of the specificity, becau
and others but it's a terrible thing that -- just a year ago, boasting al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. now an unprecedented closure of 22 embassies. >> i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think what bill is saying is true is our attempt to placate parts of the world reset to whether it's russia or somewhere else are clearly not working. the perception of weakness in this administration is encouraging this kind of behavior. >> of course, those were extreme hawks. someone needs to tell jim demint al qaeda doesn't care what you're relationship is with russia. for more on how washington reacted, i'm joined by senior correspondent michael crowley with me and "the washington post" opinion writer jonathan capehart. i guess what's interesting here, skrungt you start, it's the quick almost rabble-rousing political hysteria. instead of joining in which was the initial impulse of people like peter cink and lindsey graham was to join forces and say we've got a unique threat coming out of yemen. orders passed from pakistan. and deal with the issue at hand. instead they reverted im
with terrorists, killing osama bin laden. en even this question of al qaeda's number two, ayman al zawahiri, there was a meeting the president attend wrd he wanted more vigilance in this fight. as tom donnelly would tell me, obama said here's the deal. i want this hunt for osama bin laden and ayman al zawahiri to come to the front of the line. i worry that the trail has gone cold. this has to be our top priority. you need to ensure that we have expended every effort to take down the top leadership of al qaeda, especially these two individuals. in light of your criticism about overreaction, there is still a very specific threat and a very specific operator who is atop these organizations. >> and there continue to be a specific threat and there will continue to be terrorism as there has been for as long as human history exists. terrorism is simply the weapon by which the weak engage the strong. and what they do is they cause the strong, in this case us, to overreact. we are the one who is went into iraq and spent about a trillion and a half dollars doing it, losing, what, 2,500 -- 4,500 young
. that's where osama bin laden was born and raised. this is something, it's an organization with a lot of offshoots. it's a dispersed organization. it's intended to function that way so that eliminating one or two or even many of its top leaders don't prevent the rest of the organization from operating. and that's been true from its inception. >> that is not very encouraging. let me ask you this. as long as we're doing this reality test, and we all should be aware this is why we're talking about this as our lead story, what do you think is happening here at home? is al qaeda on our shores? >> well, i think this is one of the risks that we have to take seriously. particularly now in the wake of the boston marathon bombing on april 15th. the government has not said that there's a risk here. but you have to believe that if al qaeda thought it could strike again in america, it would certainly like to try and do so. this is something that i think we should be paying close attention to. i think it should heighten our appreciation of our intelligence gathering assets like the electronic surve
qaeda's central control has ebbed and flowed. one of the geniuses of what osama bin laden set up, really, was local groups feeding on local grievances, taking advantage of local circumstances to advance the larger cause, which they can unite around. and as they apparently did in the case of this threat in yemen. al qaeda's not like a corporation or a division -- army division in the military. it's a different kind of organization. we have to recognize that. >> it seems that the leader of al qaeda now is not on the run. apparently the reports say we intercepted some type of phone conversation, a conference call of some sort between him and maybe 20 al qaeda officials. maybe it was an internet chat. maybe there were skyping. that sounds silly that al qaeda would be on the phone with a conference call. what do you think led to this tip to close these facilities and basically how do we know as i asked originally that the coast is clear? >> i think there was probably other information in addition to this conference call. i have to stay, just to stop right there, whether it was a conference ca
think that's been the situation since well before osama bin laden and his key deputies were killed. al qaeda and affiliated similar networks continue to grow around the globe. jenna: speaking of the president, we have a sound bite from a little more recent than last year talking about the war on terror and one of the president's big speeches about foreign policy. let's take a listen to that. i'll get your reaction. >> today osama bin laden is dead and so are most of his top lieutenants. our homeland is more secure. a few of our troops are in harm's way and over the next 19 months, they'll continue to come home. our alliances is strong and so is our standing in the world. we are safer because of our efforts. jenna: that's what our viewers have heard from the president. this is the paradigm that the president was describing to us. no large scale attacks, yet we're seeing the shutting of our embassies overseas, we're told not to travel for at least another several weeks and this is all moving up until the next anniversary of 9/11. so what should we think about our safety? >> look. i have
truck bombings. it also marked the first time many americans ever heard the name osama bin laden. of course, september 11th is a critical date not only for the 2001 attacks on america but also the deadly attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya, one year ago. the state department says it's closing 21 u.s. embassies and consulates on sunday out of an abundance of caution. one official telling us the shutdown could be extended beyond sunday. here is our senior international correspondent arwa damon. she's outside the american embassy in cairo. >> reporter: behind this wall is one of the roads that leads to the u.s. embassy in cairo. normally the embassy would have been open on a sunday. it is a working day here. it will, however, be closed because of those security concerns. in the past there have been demonstrations here. there have been mobs, angry mobs, who have gathered trying to attack the embassy. september 11th of last year, for example, an incensed crowd, angered over the film that insulted prophet mohammed, tried to attack the embassy and it was the same day we saw th
complicated, because pre-9/11 it was pretty much just afghanistan. it was osama bin laden, and al qaeda senior leadership. that has since spread to somalia, yemen. we have problems in mali now. there are cells in different places. but we also have many, many more assets that we have brought to bear to try to contain them. to try to take out their leadership and try to undermine their plans. so they are still a threat. i would not agree that they're stronger than pre-9/11. >> and one of the theories is that one of the reasons we're seeing these threats right now is in that there's a lot of anger behind recent drone attacks in some of the parts of the world where the embassies are being closed, particularly in yemen. do you think that the use of these drones, so commonly in that part of the world, is actually fueling more anti-american sentiment, that's ultimately making us less safe in those areas? >> well, i mean, it's hard to say. because on the one hand there's no question that the drone strikes have made us more safe. in one very clear way, they've undermined the ability of these folks to p
was all but left for dead? >> today al qaeda is on its heels and osama bin laden is dead. >> from the attack on the u.s. embassy in benghazi, libya, to the armed takeover of a gas facility in algeria that killed three americans. >> after benghazi, these al qaeda types are really on steroids thinking we're weaker and they're stronger. >> plus those jail breaks in the last few weeks, followed by this unprecedented closing of two dozen diplomatic posts and an interpol alert, dire warnings being issued on capitol hill. >> this is your wake-up call. al qaeda is in many ways stronger than before 9/11. >> and nowhere is the bomb making threat of al qaeda more on display than in yemen. >> there are indications in the last week or two that the head of al qaeda's war in pakistan has appointed nasir al wahayshi has his head man. >> so does this indicate al qaeda is in an surge snns -- insurgence? gentlemen, thank you so much for being here. what do you think of this news that zawahri has handed over the number two position. >> it's amazing that he would outsource operations to someone thousa
. oral-b. life opens up when you do. al-qaeda is on the path of defeat and quad squad dead. and osama bin laden is dead. >> well, throughout the president's campaign for reelection last year, we heard him talk about the decimation of al-qaeda. here's what the president said in the press conference on friday. >> core al-qaeda is on its heels and decimated and i also said that al-qaeda and other extremist have matacicized in to regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> last week, the state department closed 19 american outpost in the mideast and africa and evacuated the embassy in yemen and warned americans not to travel to pakistan and evacuated nonemergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in pakistan. all because of terrorist threats. gary burn sten served as chief on three occasion and led counter terrorism deployments. and he has spent a career hunting down al-qaeda and author of a book jaw breaker the attack on bin laden and al-qaeda. gary, thank you for being here. >> (applause) >> we closed all of the embassy and consulateso all over the middle east or africa. good or b
. >> al qaeda has been decimated. >> osama bin laden is dead. >> well, throughout the president's campaign for re-election last year we heard him talk about the decimation of al qaeda. but here's what the president said in his press conference on friday. >> core al qaeda is on its heels, has been decimated. but what i also said was that al qaeda and other extremists have metastasized into regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> last week the state department closed 19 american outposts in the mideast and africa, and they evacuated the u.s. embassy in yemen. this week they warned americans not to travel to pakistan and they evacuated non-emergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in pakistan. all because of terrorist threats. gary burnson say decorated former cia officer who served as station chief on three separate occasions and led several of the agency's most important counterterrorism deployments. he spent his career hunting down al qaeda. he's also the author of a book, awbreaker: the attack on bin laden and al qaeda." gary joins me now. i appreciate you being with me. w
his 2012 reelection campaign. he said the war in afghanistan is ending. al-qaeda is on the run. osama bin laden is dead. mr. obama has also claimed that al-qaeda's core leadership is decimated, and who can forget during the first presidential run in 2008 when he vowed to root out al-qaeda, close guantanamo and improve america's moral stature around the world. then the drones came and the world sees us as merciless. merciless is what we should have been a long time ago in this conflict. new strategies and double talking generals reduced warfare to an academic exercise, shape shifting and parsing above the gravity of the enemy's threat, playing the stump master with slogans, anything to avoid saying outright what the average american knows. terrorists are alive and waiting for the big jihad payoff. why shouldn't they be when in 2009 the president announced that he was adding a token 30,000 u.s. troops to our afghan force at the same time he revealed his plan for a phased withdrawal. this was a courtesy to an al-qaeda and taliban actors who now had an expiration date for america's war. o
books on al qaeda. he produced the first tv interview of osama bin laden back in 1997. gregory johnsen is the author of the last refuge, yemen, al qaeda and america's war in arabia. welcome. peter, what triggered all of this as far as we understand it is the head of al qaeda sent a message to al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, in yemen, asking them, you know, do some terrorism, please. >> yeah, do something. >> now, is that a sign of weakness or strength? >> it's a sign of just sending a message. i mean it's do something is pretty -- it's not like, you know, the end of the world is coming. and so far whatever that something is hasn't transpired. and i think that al qaeda central is aware of its own problems and even al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is not doing particularly well, despite all of the flurry of things we've seen over the past week. about 30 of their leaders and south operatives have been killed in cia drone strikes, so their bench is thinning. >> why has yemen become the next place, after afghanistan, pakistan? >> right. well, i think in yemen you have a very weak centra
osama bin laden was in pakistan, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him -- because he was subjected more than anybody else to enhanced interrogation techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense university in may and basically said ok, now we are returning back to the pre-9/11 days. we are not at war anymore. we are going back to pre-9/11. we will go try to round up the guys when they blow up. we are no longer on a war footing, if you will, in terms of thinking about the state we're in. i think that is dead wrong. it is an absolute total misreading of where we find ourselves today. as i look at that part of the world, north africa, a good part of the middle east, not just afghanistan, where they launched 9/11 from, but also yemen and the major struggle underway in egypt, the muslim brotherhood taken power there, the group having spawned all those other radical groups,
about the intelligence community tracking of osama bin laden. the raid it says was guided by a group of satellites in space which pointed dozens of separate receivers of pakistan to collect a vast amount of data as the mission took place. it noticed the united states watches allies and enemies. counter intelligence operations are strategically focused against targets of china, russia, iran, cuba and israel. >> i don't think that would surprise anybody who we are collecting against and also what we think our major concerns are in the world. it makes sense to have that in the budget. it would be better for it nout to be out in the public domain. >> reporter: north korea says what are described as five critical gaps in u.s. intelligence about nuclear and missile programs and analysts knowing almost nothing about the intentions of new leader, kim jong-un. interesting that it was revealed in a story leaked by former contract employee, snowden, one of their own. >> much more on this with the panel. >>> a disturbing look at the fort hood shooter before his attack. >>> here is what our fox a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)